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Don't let the fact that Luca Brasi are from Tasmania fool you into thinking these guys don't get out much. This past year alone has seen them rip up stages across the nation with the likes of Violent Soho, The Bennies, The Smith Street Band, Bodyjar (to name only a few) plus a number of festivals like Breath Of Life and Hyper Fest. The punk rock four-piece also released their album By A Thread, their second since forming back in 2009. As the tour dates for next year start rolling in, we took a few minutes to catch up with the guys about the year that's been.

Hi Luca Brasi, during the 'Get Sad See Mates' tour earlier this year, you made a stop in Brisbane to perform at BigSound. How was it, what was the vibe like?

BigSound was a good time! So many mates in Brisbane at the time, ended up being the usual pretty silly party. The vibe at our show was great, we were pretty unsure what it would be like as it was a pretty small crowd when we got there. It was rad to walk on stage to a full room and have people getting loose.

Did you manage to catch any other acts or part of the conference while you were there?

A couple of us were in Brisbane a bit earlier and went to a couple parties so we saw quite a few shows. Saw Thelma Plum during one day which was rad, also our best mates The Bennies and The Sinking Teeth, things get a little blurry after that.

Just last month you guys were touring in China! How did those gigs go?

China was such a good time! The shows were awesome, very odd to be playing in such a completely different country but it was great. Apart from the cigarettes inside and the pollution which rattled us pretty hard!

What are your overseas fans like, compared to their aussie counterparts?

Chinese fans were extremely enthusiastic (not unlike here) but in a very different way, they'd kind of make sure the song was over then just go ballistic. Those few seconds of finishing a song and a pause til the explosion was pretty weird. Overall just extremely friendly people who were totally intrigued as to what the hell we were doing there.

After a year of relentless touring, you'll be home for New Years when you play Falls Festival (for the second time) in Marion Bay. What are you most looking forward to about playing the festival?

Absolutely everything! Falls is the best, a lot of our mates have moved away from Tassie but Christmas and New Years always sees everyone come home; with Falls being the culmination. Collectively we just want to hang out with Big Freeida, Queen Diva, so stoked to see her play.

For those of us on the mainland who don't trek over to Tassie too often, what's the live music scene there like?

Tassie is always a very good time when it comes to shows, it is true that it can be quite starved for touring bands but it's so damn crazy and receptive. That apparent hunger just makes shows completely awesome; Tassie loves touring bands. The local scene itself is pretty small but there are some great bands here and killer venues.

What separates the Tassie music scene from anywhere else in the world?

I'd have to say isolation is one of the defining factors, when we started out we wanted something to be happening in the state so we went out and made things happen. That isolation was one of our drives to be a band, if you want something to happen you have to push for it.

Triple j gave you guys an honourable mention at this year's J Awards – what was it for and how did that go down with you guys?

That was pretty crazy, there was a list of the nominees for album of the year and then the list of honourables and there was about 6 huge bands; Amity etc, then our name sitting in the middle of it. We were pretty blown away by it to be honest, Triple J have been super supportive of us and we can't thank them enough.

You've shared the stage with some great aussie acts this year. When you spend so much time touring or playing with other bands, do you learn from each other?

You definitely do learn a lot from other bands, touring with bands like Violent Soho you get a bit of a glimpse into how well an operation like that is run. It really is a super meticulous and professional setup, total credit to everyone involved with bands on that scale. If you ever wanted a lesson on how to remain totally grounded and have the best time possible, but still nail the show/tour, play with The Bennies, been mates for a long time and they're the biggest legends ever.

What's the most profound thing you've learnt over the past few years? Is there any solid advice you can share with us, or anything you wish you knew sooner?

Get yourself setup professionally as a band as soon as it looks like you'll be doing this for a while, so painful to have to deal with the business side later in the game. Other than that, don't be an idiot and just be nice to people, people remember that stuff. It certainly isn't hard to be polite and friendly and I can promise you that band people are nowhere near as cool as they think they are.

What's coming up from the band in 2015?

We just announced a tour for March that marks our first time bringing out an overseas support, which we are stoked about. We've got a little bit of time between now and then to focus on writing a new record and planning for the rest of the year. Lots of rad things I probably can't tell anyone about, which sucks because I'd really love to because we are stoked!

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